Thursday, December 6, 2018

Review: Hate Notes by Vi Keeland and Penelope Ward

Hate NotesHate Notes by Vi Keeland and Penelope Ward

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


Synopsis:
It all started with a mysterious blue note sewn into a wedding dress.

Something blue.
I’d gone to sell my own unworn bridal gown at a vintage clothing store. That’s when I found another bride’s “something old.”
Stitched into the lining of a fabulously feathered design was the loveliest message I’d ever read: Thank you for making all of my dreams come true.

The name embossed on the blue stationery: Reed Eastwood, obviously the most romantic man who ever lived. I also discovered he’s the most gorgeous. If only my true-love fantasies had stopped there. Because I’ve since found out something else about Mr. Starry-Eyed.
He’s arrogant, cynical, and demanding. I should know. Thanks to a twist of fate, he’s my new boss. But that’s not going to stop me from discovering the story behind his last love letter. A love letter that did not result in a happily ever after.

But that story is nothing compared to the one unfolding between us. It’s getting hotter, sweeter, and more surprising than anything I could have imagined.

Something new.

But I have no idea how this one is going to end...


Quick Review:
I enjoyed listening to the audio version. Great dual male/female narrators. I probably enjoyed the first half more than the second because I loved their banter and fun. The second half moved in a sad direction I wasn't expecting. I'm not a huge fan of the sad town blindside some authors enjoy tormenting their readers with. But I was able to compartmentalize this one and really enjoy Reed and Charlotte's story. Charlotte was so much fun. Reed was annoyingly stubborn. But together they were a delight. And this one had a lovely ending to boot.


Available on Amazon and Kindle Unlimited (including the audiobook): 
https://amzn.to/2Eh1ken

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Review: Dr Strange Beard by Penny Reid

Dr. Strange Beard (Winston Brothers, #5)Dr. Strange Beard by Penny Reid
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review:
The more Penny Reid books I read, the less prepared I am for them. Except that I am prepared to be taken on a ride into a new direction. I know that I'm getting a romance, but how I'm getting there with the newest couple is going to be journey into likely little explored dimensions. And I love that. I love that she takes risks and gives us more than just a love story. How does this relate to Roscoe and Simone's story? Because Roscoe and Simone explore new territory with their lives and their relationship, and Penny writes it so well.

Let me first say that I loved this book. I loved getting to know Roscoe and Simone. Roscoe was a fairly one-dimensional brother in the previous books of this series. I didn't know much about him except he was the baby of the family. But here he is fully exposed. And this takes us into the unknown areas of Penny's writing. Because Roscoe has a special memory situation that we learn more about. Wow, I really loved being in Roscoe's head. I felt for the guy and had so much compassion for him. He definitely became a multi-dimensional person to me. He's this sensitive, kindhearted, gentle, yet loyal and protective soul. But then to finally see him step out of his comfort zone and be vulnerable. Now that was the Roscoe I really fell in love with. And I really loved Roscoe.

Simone is also wonderful, but in her own way. I was heartbroken for her (and for Roscoe) with the abrupt way their friendship ended 10 years ago. Learning the reasonings why were understandable from a 16-year-old's up-close perspective, but from an adult stepping back from the situation perspective, I felt sad about it. But thankfully, they grew up and life brought them back together. And speaking of life, Simone's life is fascinating. The things we learn about her are fantastic, and I loved her focus and determination in career and life. She also grew in her vulnerability, which was also a beautiful thing when she and Roscoe could tackle those hurdles together.

And there are a lot of hurdles to tackle here! Simone's job is crazy town. Roscoe's memory is beyond fascinating. Roscoe is having some majorly unexpected family stuff hitting the fan. And then a whole bunch of stuff I can't even talk about for fear of spoilers. Oh man, there are things that happen here that hit me in the feels. So many things.

But let's not forget to mention the realistic and sensitive way that Penny dealt with real-life race issues in this book. I'm glad she used sensitivity readers during her writing process to give Simone's story as honest a perspective as possible. The situations Simone deals with were so well done and I loved their incorporation in a real and honest way.

I can't leave this review without once again saying how much I loved Roscoe and Simone as a couple. They have a beautiful second chance romance and I loved reading their sweet story.


**LINKS **
Amazon US: http://amzn.to/2yCyB0v
Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/2Be0r4m
Amazon AU: https://bit.ly/2NuVyXi
Amazon CA: https://amzn.to/2M2xVVJ
iBooks: https://apple.co/2ijIN7t
Nook: https://bit.ly/2LwwIKa
Kobo: https://bit.ly/2yU5zdo
Google Play: goo.gl/sGvHH3
Smashwords: https://bit.ly/2ilmIFu
Paperback: Coming August 14th!
Audiobook: Coming Soon!

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Giveaway & Review: Marriage of Inconvenience by Penny Reid


Marriage of Inconvenience by Penny Reid
Knitting in the City #7
March 6, 2018

There are three things you need to know about Kat Tanner (aka Kathleen Tyson. . . and yes, she is *that* Kathleen Tyson): 1) She’s determined to make good decisions, 2) She must get married ASAP, and 3) She knows how to knit.


Being a billionaire heiress isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. In fact, it sucks. Determined to live a quiet life, Kat Tanner changed her identity years ago and eschewed her family’s legacy. But now, Kat’s silver spoon past has finally caught up with her, and so have her youthful mistakes. To avoid imminent disaster, she must marry immediately; it is essential that the person she chooses have no romantic feelings for her whatsoever and be completely trustworthy.

Fortunately, she knows exactly who to ask. Dan O’Malley checks all the boxes: single, romantically indifferent to her, completely trustworthy. Sure, she might have a wee little crush on Dan the Security Man, but with clear rules, expectations, and a legally binding contract, Kat is certain she can make it through this debacle with her sanity—and heart—all in one piece.

Except, what happens when Dan O’Malley isn’t as indifferent—or as trustworthy—as she thought?


I'm so sad that the 'Knitting in the City' series is over, but I'm so happy it is out in the world in completion for all to fall in love with. 'Marriage of Inconvenience' was not only the highly anticipated love story of Kat and Dan (swoon, Dan), but also a love letter to the amazing characters of this series. The knitting ladies and their guys have stolen my heart, and I loved seeing them pop up throughout this story (especially Sandra and Alex, because I love them so much!).

Kat and Dan's story was a sweet, slow-building romance, that started with attraction and miscommunication, but ended in the best of ways. I'm not normally a huge fan of miscommunications and time gaps, but I really felt that these characters (especially Kat) had some growth and self-exploration to do on their own before they could be in a place for their epic romance. And they have an epic romance. These two have hearts of gold, and I loved watching their journey (though I wanted to speed things along at times, just because). I could feel their growth and love building over the pages. I especially loved Dan! I mean, he's just so dang awesome! Even stoic Quinn has a bromance with Dan, that's how awesome he is.

Reid also takes on some bigger issues beyond romance in this story, and I felt that she made the issues and points relevant and particularly treated Kat's situation with sensitivity and respect. You know when you're reading a Penny Reid book, you're going to get a little something extra in your story.

So the KitC series is over. We finally got Kat and Dan's epic love story, and yes, there is an epilogue. But the feeling is bittersweet. Kat and Dan are the sweetest! It's KitC cameo heaven! But it's also over. Good thing there's a little something called re-reading.

Read Today!
Add to GoodReads: http://bit.ly/2neqv6k


a Rafflecopter giveaway

Meet Penny Reid:
Penny Reid is the USA Today Bestselling Author of the Winston Brothers and Knitting in the City series. When she’s not immersed in penning smart romances, Penny works in the biotech industry as a researcher. She’s also a full time mom to three diminutive adults, wife, daughter, knitter, crocheter, sewer, general crafter, and thought ninja.


PennyReid.jpgConnect with Penny:
Twitter: @ReidRomance

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Blog Tour & Giveaway: Beard in Mind by Penny Reid

BEARD IN MIND BT BANNER.jpg

Beard in Mind, an all new standalone in the bestselling, romantic comedy Winston Brothers Series by Penny Reid, is available NOW!

BIM-cover (2)

All is fair in love and auto maintenance.

Beau Winston is the nicest, most accommodating guy in the world. Usually.
Handsome as the devil and twice as charismatic, Beau lives a charmed life as everyone’s favorite Winston Brother. But since his twin decided to leave town, and his other brother hired a stunning human-porcupine hybrid as a replacement mechanic for their auto shop, Beau Winston’s charmed life has gone to hell in a handbasket.

Shelly Sullivan is not nice and is never accommodating. Ever.
She mumbles to herself, but won’t respond when asked a question. She glares at everyone, especially babies. She won’t shake hands with or touch another person, but has no problems cuddling with a dog. And her damn parrot speaks only in curse words.

Beau wants her gone. He wants her out of his auto shop, out of Tennessee, and out of his life.

The only problem is, learning why this porcupine wears her coat of spikes opens a Pandora’s box of complexity—exquisite, tempting, heartbreaking complexity—and Beau Winston soon discovers being nice and accommodating might mean losing what matters most.

  She’d taken the sofa, in her own house, and given me the bed. That didn’t make a lick of sense. I crouched next to her, threading my fingers into the silky hair at her temples. “Honey.”
  “Mmm.”
  I bent to whisper, “Shelly.”
  “Hmm?”
  “I’m going to carry you to your bed. I’ll take the sofa.”
  “Mmm.”
  I grinned at her soft noises, at the untroubled expression on her face, and how her brow—even in sleep—still looked regal and stern. Sliding my arms under her legs and shoulder, I picked her up. And, unfortunately, that woke her up.
  She jerked in my arms. “What are you doing?”
  “I’m taking you to the bed.”
  “Don’t do that.”
  “I don’t mind, I’ll take the sofa.” Our mouths were just inches apart, and hers was distracting.
  She squirmed. “Put me down.”
  Sighing unhappily, I did. I set her on her feet next to the couch. The blanket pooled at her feet and I stepped back to give her some space. It was dark, but I could see her just fine, and that meant I had to force my eyes to remain above her neck. The woman was wearing two pathetic scraps of fabric as pajamas. A thin little tank top and shorts. That’s it. I set my jaw and turned to the side, waiting for her to walk past.“Where are you?”
  I glanced at her and realized she couldn’t see at all. She didn’t have a hand out, but the way her eyes were moving about the room gave away her blindness.
  “I’m here.” I didn’t touch her, because if I did, I wouldn’t want to stop.
  Shelly turned her head in my direction and took a deep breath. Still she didn’t reach for me. I didn’t know the specifics of what to expect after her Friday session, but I recalled Dr. West saying something about Shelly doing self-guided ERP exercises over this week.
  “Can you see?” She licked her lips, her voice sandpapery. “Because I can’t see at all. It’s so dark.”
  “I can see.” Unbidden, my eyes dropped to her body, to the swell of her breasts, the panel of bare stomach, the curve of her hips. Pinpricks of heat raised over my skin and I curled my hands into fists. She shuffled forward and I caught her before she bumped into me, setting my hands gently at her waist.
  “Let me take you to your room.” My voice was rough, for obvious reasons. Saying nothing, she brought her hand to my forearm, her body gently colliding with mine. And then her hand on my arm slid up my bicep to my shoulder.
  “Shelly.” I was running out of breath.
  “I like this.”
  “What?”
  “Touching you.”
  Oh f--k.
  I held still and endured her hands moving over my body, down the front of my shirt, stopping at the hem, then pushing it up.
  “Take this off.”
  I did. I pulled the T-shirt over my head and let it drop to the floor. We stood there, facing each other in the dark, not touching. Despite the session on Friday and the progress that had been made, I realized she wasn’t quite there yet. Dr. West was right, Friday was just a step, the first step. Shelly wasn’t able to initiate contact. Not yet.
  Her hands balled into fists and she swayed forward, her breath struggling little puffs. If anything was going to happen tonight, I had to initiate it. I had to be the one to touch first. God, how I wanted her. How I wanted her above me, beneath me, surrounding me. But how could I?
  “I know why I hesitate,” her voice was breathless, “but why do you hesitate?”
  “Lots of reasons.”
  “Give me one.”
  “I don’t want to use you.”
  “I wish you would.”
  That pulled a laugh from me, just a small relief from the mounting tension. My eyes moved over her body, an undeniable impulse to devour the sight of her, her legs, stomach, chest, then up her neck to her lips.
  “You asked me on Saturday if sex was a big deal for me, or if it was you. The answer is both.”
  She held very still, and I got the sense she was holding her breath, straining to listen.  “You are a big deal to me. I don’t want a fling. I don’t want a flirtation. I want promises.”
  “What can I promise you?”
  That you’ll love me. That I’ll be your priority.
  She shifted her weight from foot to foot. A spike of anxiety that she might leave me like this had me acting without forethought. I lifted my hands to her waist again and immediately, her fingertips skimmed over the skin of my lower stomach in response, making my muscles tense in hot anticipation. She grew more assertive as she caressed my sides, abdomen, ribs, chest, shoulders, and then back down. Shelly stepped closer, a hint of thrilling contact between her breasts and my torso, and all the words and worries melted from my mind, died on my tongue, suffocated by the feel of her body, and the possibility of this moment.
  Her finger hooked in the waistband of my jeans. “Take these off.” Her hand turned, her fingers and palm cupping me over my zipper. Instinctively, I pressed myself into her touch even as I grabbed her wrist.
  “Beau, I promise—” She didn’t get to speak, because I kissed her, hard and wild, unbuttoning and unzipping my fly with one hand and bringing her palm inside my boxers with the other.


'Beard in Mind' is the fifth Winston sibling book (after Ashley, Duane, Jethro, and Cletus's books). Of course, you can read this as a standalone. It's a rich and full-bodied story all on its own. But I will say that you will get an even fuller appreciation for it, and the Winston universe, if you have read the other previous books (and parts of the Knitting in the City series).

'Beard in Mind' may be Penny Reid's deepest book yet. It's a rich exploration of life and love, mental health and family, truth and trust. There was so much research and heart put into this book, giving these characters and their storylines more than just a superficial stereotyping, and instead making them whole and real and unjudged.

Shelly suffers from OCD. Not a flippant "you're so OCD because you're a neat freak." No, her OCD is the real deal. It's been a lifelong struggle, and she has only started treatment in recent months. Now, if you remember Shelly from previous books, she was not painted in a pretty picture. She has hurt her family in terrible ways. And on first impression, Shelly is completely rude and off-putting, despite her beauty. And yet here we finally get to know who the real Shelly is. And what a layered character she is. So many levels, so much depth beyond the gorgeous surface, and yet so difficult to get to know without putting in the effort. Thankfully, Beau and his genuine nature is just the person to reach past the superficial.

Beau's recent struggles are much different than Shelly's. His twin brother, Duane, is preparing to leave the country with his girlfriend, Jess, to travel for an extended period of time. Beau and Duane have never been apart. And Beau is crushed to be losing his other half. Then he has a new co-worker, Shelly, who is as rude as Beau is nice. Despite her attitude, however, Beau can't help but want to get to know her more and get past her prickly exterior. And that's a good thing, too, because Beau and Shelly have even more struggles and surprises to come, and they are going to need each other's support to get through it all.

There are so many things I loved about this book that I can't list them all (too lengthy and too many spoilers). But let me narrow my thoughts down to a few:

1.) I loved the relationship development between Beau and Shelly. It wasn't insta-love. It was a hard-fought, knocking-down-walls, looking-past-the-superficial, and traversing the "for worse" parts of love. It was a mature love, looking at all the parts of a partner, not just the sweet honeymoon period. And it was deep, digging into parts of each other that in a "normal" relationship may not come up until much later in a relationship.

2.) I loved how honest and real, genuine and loving, Beau and Shelly treated one another. The road was not easy, and things were not always resolved quickly, but these two weren't quitters. They genuinely cared about the other, and you could feel that love through the pages.

3.) Oh, and there's heat. I'd say this is the hottest of the Winston brothers series. Yes, Beau and Shelly are dealing with some intense issues. But these two have no shortage of sexy times. Beau is not only sweet, but sexy.

4.) I need to reiterate the caring and real way that OCD was handled in this book. There are some beautiful scenes between Shelly and her therapist, and I loved how tenderly yet honestly this disorder was handled. It allowed us to see Shelly as more than just her disorder, and allowed us to see Beau in an incredibly supportive light. And yet Shelly was not limited to her OCD. We also see her in so many other dimensions, in particular as a crucial player in Beau's journey.

5.) And of course, let's not forget the Winston bunch, their significant others, and the residents of Green Valley. I loved the inter-weaving of storylines (did you read Beard Science?). I love the Winston family in general, and gobbled up all their interactions throughout the novel. Hank and Beau had a particularly fun friendship, and I liked seeing more glimpses of Hank (whom I'm intrigued by, despite my dislike for The Pink Pony). And my interest was peaked about many of the townsfolk popping up here and there, hoping they'll pop up more in future books.

I hadn't planned on such a lengthy review, but I can't help but sing the praises of this story. It may not be for everyone. If you're looking for a typical romance, with a typical hero and heroine, you may be disappointed. Beau and Shelly are not typical, but for me that made them even more special. Take a chance on this story, and let your heart and mind be moved.



LIVE 

Read Today!

(Free in Kindle Unlimited)
Add to GoodReads: https://goo.gl/hsTLLC

BT-Giveaway.jpg

Enter the Giveaway!


Meet Penny Reid:

Penny Reid is the USA Today Bestselling Author of the Winston Brothers and Knitting in the City series. When she’s not immersed in penning smart romances, Penny works in the biotech industry as a researcher. She’s also a full time mom to three diminutive adults, wife, daughter, knitter, crocheter, sewer, general crafter, and thought ninja. PennyReid

Connect with Penny:

Twitter: @ReidRomance

Review: Shear Heaven by Katy Regnery

Shear Heaven by Katy Regnery
~a Modern Fairytale novella~
August 22, 2017
~Find on the Royally Mine anthology~

In this "Rapunzel" retelling, Bella Capelli, a hair stylist who works on the 32nd floor of the New York Metro Tower Hotel, meets His Serene Highness Prince Nico De'Medici, in town for the wedding of his twin sister, Valentina. Though the two come from vastly different worlds, and Nico is promised to another, the handsome prince can't seem to stay away from sweet Bella. After a whirlwind week of romance, will they manage to find their happily-ever-after?

SHEAR HEAVEN is a 30,000 word standalone novella based on "Rapunzel." Intended for readers 18+ due to scenes of graphic intimacy.

'Shear Heaven' was such a treat! This is a sweet novella that packs a heartfelt punch. I loved this creative twist on the story of Rapunzel. Bella is this lovely girl, inside and out, "trapped" in a tower, and Nico is this dashing prince, trapped in his life as well. When these two meet, the chemistry cannot be denied. But in true fairy tale form, there might be true love, but there are also true obstacles stacked against them. I found their story touching (seriously, they were so sweet and lovely and perfect for each other), and frustrating (because, you know, in every fairy tale there has to be a villain, and this one was a real meanie), and the perfect ending (awww, I love them!). Rapunzel and her sweet Prince were a delightful, romantic treat.

Amazon ~ Kobo ~ iBooks ~ B&N 

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Review: Beard in Mind by Penny Reid

Beard in Mind by Penny Reid
(Winston Brothers #4)
August 1, 2017
Genre: Contemporary Romance 18+
Contains: language, sex

All's fair in love and auto maintenance.

Beau Winston is the nicest, most accommodating guy in the world. Usually.
Handsome as the devil and twice as charismatic, Beau lives a charmed life as everyone’s favorite Winston Brother. But since his twin decided to leave town, and his other brother hired a stunning human-porcupine hybrid as a replacement mechanic for their auto shop, Beau Winston’s charmed life has gone to hell in a handbasket.

Shelly Sullivan is not nice and is never accommodating. Ever.
She mumbles to herself, but won’t respond when asked a question. She glares at everyone, especially babies. She won’t shake hands with or touch another person, but has no problems cuddling with a dog. And her damn parrot speaks only in curse words.

Beau wants her gone. He wants her out of his auto shop, out of Tennessee, and out of his life.

The only problem is, learning why this porcupine wears her coat of spikes opens a Pandora’s box of complexity—exquisite, tempting, heartbreaking complexity—and Beau Winston soon discovers being nice and accommodating might mean missing out on what matters most.

'Beard in Mind' is the fifth Winston sibling book (after Ashley, Duane, Jethro, and Cletus's books). Of course, you can read this as a standalone. It's a rich and full-bodied story all on its own. But I will say that you will get an even fuller appreciation for it, and the Winston universe, if you have read the other previous books (and parts of the Knitting in the City series).

'Beard in Mind' may be Penny Reid's deepest book yet. It's a rich exploration of life and love, mental health and family, truth and trust. There was so much research and heart put into this book, giving these characters and their storylines more than just a superficial stereotyping, and instead making them whole and real and unjudged.

Shelly suffers from OCD. Not a flippant "you're so OCD because you're a neat freak." No, her OCD is the real deal. It's been a lifelong struggle, and she has only started treatment in recent months. Now, if you remember Shelly from previous books, she was not painted in a pretty picture. She has hurt her family in terrible ways. And on first impression, Shelly is completely rude and off-putting, despite her beauty. And yet here we finally get to know who the real Shelly is. And what a layered character she is. So many levels, so much depth beyond the gorgeous surface, and yet so difficult to get to know without putting in the effort. Thankfully, Beau and his genuine nature is just the person to reach past the superficial.

Beau's recent struggles are much different than Shelly's. His twin brother, Duane, is preparing to leave the country with his girlfriend, Jess, to travel for an extended period of time. Beau and Duane have never been apart. And Beau is crushed to be losing his other half. Then he has a new co-worker, Shelly, who is as rude as Beau is nice. Despite her attitude, however, Beau can't help but want to get to know her more and get past her prickly exterior. And that's a good thing, too, because Beau and Shelly have even more struggles and surprises to come, and they are going to need each other's support to get through it all.

There are so many things I loved about this book that I can't list them all (too lengthy and too many spoilers). But let me narrow my thoughts down to a few:

1.) I loved the relationship development between Beau and Shelly. It wasn't insta-love. It was a hard-fought, knocking-down-walls, looking-past-the-superficial, and traversing the "for worse" parts of love. It was a mature love, looking at all the parts of a partner, not just the sweet honeymoon period. And it was deep, digging into parts of each other that in a "normal" relationship may not come up until much later in a relationship.

2.) I loved how honest and real, genuine and loving, Beau and Shelly treated one another. The road was not easy, and things were not always resolved quickly, but these two weren't quitters. They genuinely cared about the other, and you could feel that love through the pages.

3.) Oh, and there's heat. I'd say this is the hottest of the Winston brothers series. Yes, Beau and Shelly are dealing with some intense issues. But these two have no shortage of sexy times. Beau is not only sweet, but sexy.

4.) I need to reiterate the caring and real way that OCD was handled in this book. There are some beautiful scenes between Shelly and her therapist, and I loved how tenderly yet honestly this disorder was handled. It allowed us to see Shelly as more than just her disorder, and allowed us to see Beau in an incredibly supportive light. And yet Shelly was not limited to her OCD. We also see her in so many other dimensions, in particular as a crucial player in Beau's journey.

5.) And of course, let's not forget the Winston bunch, their significant others, and the residents of Green Valley. I loved the inter-weaving of storylines (did you read Beard Science?). I love the Winston family in general, and gobbled up all their interactions throughout the novel. Hank and Beau had a particularly fun friendship, and I liked seeing more glimpses of Hank (whom I'm intrigued by, despite my dislike for The Pink Pony). And my interest was peaked about many of the townsfolk popping up here and there, hoping they'll pop up more in future books.

I hadn't planned on such a lengthy review, but I can't help but sing the praises of this story. It may not be for everyone. If you're looking for a typical romance, with a typical hero and heroine, you may be disappointed. Beau and Shelly are not typical, but for me that made them even more special. Take a chance on this story, and let your heart and mind be moved.

Monday, July 24, 2017

Review: Making It Right by Catherine Bybee

Making It Right by Catherine Bybee
(Most Likely To #3)
May 9, 2017
350 pages

In the final book in bestselling author Catherine Bybee’s Most Likely To trilogy, River Bend’s rebel follows in her father’s footsteps to become sheriff. But it might be time to forge her own path…

Some kids inherit a family business; Jo Ward inherited a badge. Once voted Most Likely to End Up in Jail, the town wild child has become sheriff—hell-bent on uncovering the truth about her father’s mysterious death. Life is quiet in rustic River Bend, but Jo longs for something beyond her small hometown and the painful memories it holds. All that keeps her sane is the support of her best friends, Melanie and Zoe.

But when Jo signs up for an expert law enforcement training seminar, she meets Gill Clausen, whose haunting eyes and dangerously sexy vibe just may challenge her single-minded focus. Commitment-phobic Jo can’t deny her attraction to the arrogant federal agent, and when odd things start happening around River Bend and danger surrounds her, she realizes she’ll need his help to discover who’s out to remove her from River Bend…permanently.

As Jo and Gill work together, it’s clear they make a great team. But can Jo loosen her grip on the past enough to let love in and reach for the future?

I've really enjoyed this trilogy, following the friendships, hardships, and romantic lives of Mel, Zoe, and Jo. And this third story brought everything together, finally bringing us Jo's story. It was a beautiful thing to see Jo come into herself. Living in her father's shadow and unresolved death, we didn't quite know who Jo was as an adult. And this story brought Jo to the forefront. She became her true self. And she fought for the truth. And during all this she found her perfect match in Gill. I loved them together, and loved what Bybee did with their story and their future. I'm sad to see these ladies go, but this series was a delight and Jo's story was a touching ending.